Tag Archives: allegory

Arena Spotlight and GIVEAWAY!

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About the Book

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Book: Arena

Author: Karen Hancock

Genre: Fantasy

Release Date: April 16, 2022

A Journey She Did Not Choose Will Change Her Life Forever

Transported surreptitiously to a terrifying alien world, with limited resources and only a few cryptic words to guide her, Callie Hayes finds herself engulfed in a perilous battle for freedom – for her very life. After agreeing to participate in a routine psychology research experiment, she must unravel the mysteries shrouding her only route of escape or risk succumbing to the deadly deception of the Arena.

Click HERE to get your copy!

About the Author

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Karen Hancock has won Christy Awards for each of her first four novels—Arena and the first three books in the Legends of the Guardian-King series, The Light of Eidon, The Shadow Within, and Shadow over Kiriath. She graduated from the University of Arizona with bachelor’s degrees in biology and wildlife biology. Along with writing, she is a semi-professional watercolorist and has exhibited her work in a number of national juried shows. She and her family reside in Arizona.

More from Karen

Arena was not my first novel. The Light of Eidon was. In those days, however, Christian publishers were not interested in the fantasy genre because it had too much magic and wizards and such, despite the publication of the works of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. They were softening to science fiction, however, and thanks to Kathy Tyers, Randy Ingermanson, John Olson and others the door was opened in 2001 for what is called “speculative fiction.” Arena fit right in, and was published by Bethany House in 2002. It went on to win a Christy Award, which started the ball rolling for the Guardian King series. Three out of the four Guardian King books in that series also won Christy Awards, at which point I was the first speculative fiction author inducted into the Christy Award Hall of Fame in 2013.

I am thrilled to have Arena appear again in this 20th anniversary edition with a new cover and in limited-edition hardcover. Oasis Audio will also be producing the audiobook, for the first time, so it can be available for every type of reader.

Blog Stops

Inside the Wong Mind, April 30

For the Love of Literature, May 1 (Spotlight)

Rachael’s Inkwell, May 1

Beauty in the Binding, May 2 (Spotlight)

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, May 2

Texas Book-aholic, May 3

Inklings and notions, May 4

For Him and My Family, May 5

deb’s Book Review, May 6

Locks, Hooks and Books, May 7

Tell Tale Book Reviews, May 8

Ashley’s Clean Book Reviews, May 9

Because I said so — and other adventures in Parenting, May 10

Blogging With Carol, May 11

Truth and Grace Homeschool Academy, May 12

Through the Fire Blogs, May 13

Giveaway

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To celebrate her tour, Karen is giving away the grand prize of a $40 Amazon gift card and signed copy of Arena!!

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/1d3bd/arena-celebraiton-tour-giveaway

“An In-Between Place”: A Book Review of Shawn Smucker’s “These Nameless Things”

These Nameless Things

This is the most unique and unusual book that I have read in 2020, and perhaps in the past several years. It almost defies classification, and although I have a rather terrible memory, I know that this story is one that will remain with me, and one that I will be pondering for a long time to come. Since this is my first Shawn Smucker read, I don’t know if his other books are similar, but I intend to find out! These Nameless Things is a stunning amalgamation of allegory, dystopian, magical realism, and psychological horror. While reading, I found myself jotting down one quotation after another because the writing is so poetically profound. This is one of the few books that I plan to read again, likely more than once, and I anticipate discovering more details each time. As such, this novel would make an excellent choice for a book club or discussion group.

Smucker has taken an age-old question and written a compelling narrative around it, addressing it from the future-set prologue: “Have you ever, for a flash of time, understood the significance of being? The miracle of existing?” Perhaps the best part of the story is looking back from the last page and realizing how the many subtleties click into place. These Nameless Things brings to mind the essence of several famous stories, including Plato’s Cave and Dante’s Inferno. It has a Twilight-Zone ambiance and an intentional timelessness to it. While it has vague references to Scripture and is a clean read, I find that the story is more thematically spiritual, with overarching Christian symbolism that is for the most part subtle. By this I mean that believers will easily recognize it, and those not of the faith will most likely enjoy the story for its own sake because there is no overt proselytizing.

Along with the themes, some of the other aspects of this striking novel that appealed to me include the chapter titles and the anthropomorphism. I cannot remember the last adult fiction book I read that had chapter titles, and it was both refreshing and appreciated. It took me a while to understand what was happening in the novel, and for a while in the beginning I felt baffled, which is intentional on the author’s part and will make sense later on, and the titles helped to bring some comprehension amidst the surreal atmosphere. As an aside, the cover is beautifully done, depicting the haunting essence of the story, with the mountain looming in the background, an ominous juggernaut. These Nameless Things is ultimately a story about secrets, guilt, and forgiveness. Dan, the first-person narrator, relates that “The secrets piled up inside of me. They hibernated into cocoons, transforming into things that had lives of their own.” Later on, another character tells him that “In this place, our guilt consumes us…The only thing that can rescue anyone from this deep darkness is grace.” This is the redemptive message of These Nameless Things: hope in the power of confronting and confessing our guilt, and hope in the unmerited gift of grace.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell and was under no obligation to post a positive review. All opinions are my own.

My rating: 5 stars ♥♥♥♥♥

Click HERE to buy These Nameless Things