Tag Archives: Bible study

Insights on the Book of Daniel Review and GIVEAWAY!

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About the Book

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Book: Insights on the Book of Daniel

Author: Dr. Alan B. Stringfellow

Genre: RELIGION / Biblical Studies/Old Testament/Prophet

Release Date: December 1, 2020

For more than four decades, Alan Stringfellow’s Bible studies have brought greater insight into God’s Word to thousands of believers. Now, the author of Through the Bible in One Year and Great Characters of the Bible leads readers on a 12-lesson, verse-by-verse study of the book of Daniel. Stringfellow’s in-depth teaching will bring clarity and understanding to one of the most misunderstood books in Scripture. With this study, readers will learn…

  • How to identify the major themes
  • How to memorize key verses
  • How to recognize God’s central message
  • An overview of various interpretations of the book’s imagery
  • The role Daniel’s prophesies play in the entire biblical story

By embarking on this journey, believers will discover the influence that Daniel had on the life and literature of the Jewish people throughout the biblical period and all the way to the writers of the New Testament, including Jesus Christ Himself, who often quoted from it. But nowhere is that influence seen as thoroughly as in the writings of the apostle John and parallels that exist with the book of Revelation. As in John’s prophetic work, the book of Daniel describes in beautiful and marvelous language the glorious coming of our Lord, Jesus Christ. Like John, Daniel was sure and certain about the final triumph of the kingdom of God.

Click HERE to get your copy!

About the Author

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Dr. Alan B. Stringfellow (1922-1993), a Bible teacher and minister of the gospel for more than four decades, specialized in Christian education. Long concerned with the struggle most people have in understanding the Bible, he set out to write a study course that would bring believers more knowledge and a greater appreciation of God’s Word. He wrote Through the Bible in One Year, Great Truths of the Bible, and Great Characters in the Bible for laymen, to be taught by laymen. His latest studies include Insights on the Book of Revelation and Insights on the Book of Isaiah. Dr. Stringfellow trained at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, after which he served at Travis Avenue Baptist Church in Fort Worth; First Baptist Church of West Palm Beach, Florida; First Baptist Church of Fresno, California; and First Baptist Church of Van Nuys, California.

More about Dr. Alan

  • Through the Bible in One Year has sold more than 30,000 copies
  • Stringfellow’s solid Bible-based theology crosses all denominational and theological lines
  • Book of Daniel and its prophetic tone of the coming of the Messiah and the ultimate triumph of the kingdom of God sparks great interest in believers
  • Completes a trio of studies along with Insights on the Book of Revelation and Insights on the Book of Isaiah
  • Can be utilized for individual or group study

My Review

A detailed exegesis, Insights on the Book of Daniel by the late Dr. Alan Stringfellow delves into the apocalyptic nature of Daniel and how it compares to and is irrevocably linked with the book of Revelation. There are a plethora of details, both historic and Biblical, to glean from this text, which I would advise prefacing with a complete reading of both Daniel and Revelation in the Bible itself. Doing so will provide the familiarity, whether new or refreshed, necessary to fully engage in this study and allow the reader to critically analyze Dr. Stringfellow’s interpretation. While I do not agree with all of his points or conclusions, I did learn new information about the history of the ancient world and about some of the connections between Scripture verses.

Most fascinating to me, and something that I never grow tired of learning about, is how Scripture is supernaturally interweaved, proving its divine authorship by God despite being written by multiple human men over the course of centuries. Stringfellow makes this very apparent in his comparison between the books of Daniel and Revelation. In regard to Daniel, the vision of the end times given to him in chapter twelve is sealed up, to be unsealed in Revelation. Both Daniel and John receive similar visions while in exile that reveal what will come to be during the end times, and both are “beloved” by the Lord.

In Stringfellow’s view, the times of the Gentiles refers to a period beginning with God’s appointment of Nebuchadnezzar, a Gentile, in place of the Israelite kings and ending when Israel becomes “the head of the nations” once again, while the fullness of the Gentiles, he claims, will occur when those Gentiles whom the Holy Spirit has called out will be gathered with the rest of the church in the Rapture. He remarks that Daniel was a unique prophet because rather than declaring the Word of God, he was to “record what was revealed to him through visions.” I also find the comparison of the similarities between Daniel and the lion’s den and Jesus’s resurrection very interesting, especially as they are both well-known events but not necessarily considered side-by-side.

Some of Stringfellow’s interpretation becomes clearly recognizable as an issue that has grown increasingly prevalent now: “To weld the power together in a common faith is the finest way to make them one, however diversified they may be otherwise.” He goes on to explain the system of Babylonialism, a way of living and ruling that eradicates God and seeks an (albeit impossible) paradise without Him. If that is not an apt description of society and the world today, I don’t know what is!

With an outline format, meaning plenty of lists and sub-lists, Insights on the Book of Daniel is an informative, enlightening read for those interested in apocalyptic literature of the Bible, or for anyone seeking a different perspective to provoke thought or discussion. Because this book is set up to be a Bible study, the end of each chapter contains a section for contemplation: “How Much Do You Remember?” questions; “Your Assignment for Next Week”; and “Lesson Notes” with blank lines ready to be filled. Because these can be difficult to work with on a tablet or computer, I personally would recommend the paperback should you choose to purchase it; as of the time of this writing, the price for both the Kindle and paperback formats are nearly the same.

I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

My rating: 4 stars ♥♥♥♥

Blog Stops

Book Reviews From an Avid Reader, December 4

Sara Jane Jacobs, December 5

Mary Hake, December 5

For the Love of Literature, December 6

Texas Book-aholic, December 7

Locks, Hooks and Books, December 8

For Him and My Family, December 9

Simple Harvest Reads, December 10 (Spotlight)

deb’s Book Review, December 10

Artistic Nobody, December 11 (Guest Review from Joni Truex)

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, December 12

Ashley’s Bookshelf, December 13

Godly Book Reviews, December 14

Because I said so — and other adventures in Parenting, December 15

Truth and Grace Homeschool Academy, December 16

Inklings and notions, December 17

Captive Dreams Window, December 17

Giveaway

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To celebrate their tour, Whitaker House is giving away the grand prize package of a $20 Starbucks gift card and a copy of the book!!

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/10456/insights-on-the-book-of-daniel-celebration-tour-giveaway

The Other 3:16s Review and GIVEAWAY!

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About the Book

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Book: The Other 3:16s

Author: Malinda Fugate

Genre: Christian Living

Release Date: May 12, 2020

”For God so loved the world . . . “

Many of us could finish that sentence in our sleep. John 3:16 is a beautiful Scripture that neatly and simply sums up the message of the Gospel. But what do all the other 3:16s in the Bible have to tell us?

The words of the Bible weave a tapestry of love, particularly the love that our Heavenly Father has for His children. But a love so deep and so wide cannot be contained in one memorized phrase. It takes multiple authors of sixty-six individual books to begin to explore the mystery of God’s care for us.

The Other Three Sixteens by Malinda Fugate examines each third chapter and sixteenth verse in the Bible and invites a fresh, new perspective to help readers uncover surprises or remind them of forgotten truths of a faith that has become routine.

Through Genesis to Revelation, we can soak in its depth, wonder at its intricacies, and be moved at how much the Lord truly does lavish upon us. Together, we discover God’s love under the weight of Eve’s sin in the garden. It’s there in front of Moses, burning in a bush that is somehow not consumed. God’s love sits in the dark with Job, rebuilds a wall with Nehemiah, and encourages a young pastor named Timothy. Together we will find a deeper understanding of the way our Heavenly Father cares for each of us today.

Click HERE to get your copy! 

About the Author

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Malinda Fugate grew up in children’s ministry. Now, after two decades of dedicated volunteer service, she now serves full-time as the Children’s Education Director at a church in Southern California. Malinda studied communications and theatre at Azusa Pacific University, then worked behind the scenes at the Los Angeles Salem radio stations, including The Fish and KKLA. Her writing includes The Other Three Sixteens, Bible Time for Active Kids, commercial copywriting, various faith-based stage and screen plays, as well as co-producing A Single Girl’s Guide To, a lifestyle blog and web series. Her lifelong study of God’s Word continues to reveal more about the Lord every day. She lives by the beach with her pup, Yoshi.

 

More from Malinda

It’s the first verse many of us memorized in Sunday School and perhaps the most familiar to any Christian: “For God so loved the world….”

In one sentence, we celebrate the incredible love of God and the amazing gift of salvation that Jesus gave through the cross. John 3:16 is a beautiful Scripture to keep in our hearts and minds.

Of course, John did not assign chapters and verses when he penned his gospel. Those were added later to help us reference as we study. Yet, years of reciting John 3:16 have etched these lines into our brains, making it an easy combo to remember. What if we looked at the other 3:16 verses in each book of the Bible? What treasures would we unearth hidden in our well-worn pages?

We find Adam and Eve in their last days in a garden paradise, dealing with the consequences of a terrible decision.

There is a young boy training to be a priest who suddenly hears the audible voice of God.

A king’s cup-bearer journeys to his homeland to lead a massive construction project despite adversity.

We sit next to Job in his darkest days, crying out to God for answers.

We meet a young pastor named Timothy, experience miraculous healings, and witness the baptism of Jesus Himself.

Most of all, in every verse, we discover the immense love of God. We learn that it cannot be contained simply in one phrase; such a great love is too full of rich detail. Most of all, we find that His love is alive and active in our very own lives, right this minute.

My Review

A unique approach to studying the Bible, Malinda Fugate’s The Other 3:16s considers the universally-known John 3:16 and the Bible’s resounding message of love and explores the third chapter and sixteenth verse of the other books of the Bible that have them. She bases her analysis on the fact that God is love and that He has an overwhelming love for all of His children. Proceeding in order, she begins with Genesis and moves through both the Old and New Testaments, ending with Revelation and John. Not only is this logical and easy to follow, but I love that she includes the Old as well as the New Testament. The former tends to be written about less often, and it is challenging reading. I am impressed with the effort that the author has put into the organization and presentation of this book.

The Other 3:16s offers the big picture of the Bible in the form of a continuing narrative related by the author. As such, it can be read as one would a regular book, or it can be used as a devotional. This latter option is bolstered by the discussion questions that the author has graciously provided at the end of the book; they are merged with a Bible reading plan and formatted into either 6-or 10-week time spans, although this could be adjusted to the reader’s preference. Along these same lines, Fugate has arranged each chapter to discuss a book of the Bible. The verse corresponding with chapter 3 verse 16 is written out, and then she explains the setting and historical background, which is so important of any writing, but especially to a text as sacred as the Bible. In order to gain an understanding of the Lord and His workings from the earliest times through the book of Revelation, it’s necessary to have at least a basic knowledge of the individual Bible books and also be able to put them together as one cohesive narrative. Also, Fugate ties in the most-often-quoted verses from the Bible book from which they come, which is also helpful in bringing everything together. With an e-book copy, when I pulled up my notes section to read the passages that I highlighted, I was surprised and delighted to find that each one had the Bible book noted above it.

Speaking of the content itself, aside from a few isolated instances, this nonfiction book follows Scripture and provides information and clarification about the historical and cultural milieu, which helps readers to more fully understand what is transpiring and how it is significant. This, in turn, draws readers closer to the God who “welcomes questions from His children when they come from humble, reverent hearts.” I appreciate that Fugate acknowledges the tough questions that we all ask at some point, the answers to which we will probably never fully know on this side of eternity, concluding that we simply need to trust God because He always has everything under His perfect control, and His plans for His children are always for our good and for His glory. And so, “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God.”

I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

My rating: 5 stars ♥♥♥♥♥

Blog Stops

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, September 4

Texas Book-aholic, September 5

Inklings and notions, September 6

deb’s Book Review, September 6

For Him and My Family, September 7

Hebrews 12 Endurance, September 8

Locks, Hooks and Books, September 9

Artistic Nobody, September 10 (Guest Review from Joni Truex)

Ashley’s Bookshelf, September 11

Sara Jane Jacobs, September 12

For the Love of Literature, September 13

Mary Hake, September 13

Because I said so — and other adventures in Parenting, September 14

Lights in a Dark World, September 15

Splashes of Joy, September 16

Happily Managing a Household of Boys, September 17

Giveaway

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To celebrate her tour, Malinda is giving away the grand prize package of A John 3:16 glass water bottle and a signed copy of the book!!

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/fffc/the-other-3-16s-celebration-tour-giveaway

Greek Word Study Review and GIVEAWAY!

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About the Book

 

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Book: Greek Word Study

Author: Chris Palmer

Genre: Christian Non-fiction, Educational

Release Date: July 17, 2020

 

“Flour. Sheep. Coins. Wheat. Jesus never abandoned the familiarity of His time because what He had to say was so celestial or deep. Instead, He took advantage of what people already understood. In doing so, He didn’t just leave a way of salvation for us, but also a pattern of teaching to follow. This alone was my inspiration for how I chose to write Greek Word Study.”—author Chris Palmer

In a follow-up to his highly acclaimed book Letters from Jesus: Studies from the Seven Churches of Revelation, the Rev. Chris Palmer has written Greek Word Study: 90 Ancient Words That Unlock Scripture. With wit, humor, grace, and scholarship, Chris offers biblical insights while teaching Koine Greek words and phrases one delightful bite at a time. Unlike other books that overwhelm readers with Greek grammar, word formation, tenses, and the like, Chris makes the language accessible to anyone, using modern stories and analogies that engage readers and draw them into the Scriptures. Learning some Greek words and phrases helps you read the Bible in high definition!

“You don’t need to be scholar to read this book and you don’t need to know an ounce of Greek either. In fact, you don’t even have to really know much about the Bible at all,” Chris says. “All you need to do is just kick back and enjoy.”

Click HERE to get your copy!

 

About the Author

 

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The Rev. Chris Palmer is the founder and pastor of Light of Today Church in Novi, Michigan, and founder of Chris Palmer Ministries. He is host of the popular podcast, Greek for the Week, seen on several Internet platforms. His first book with Whitaker House, Letters from Jesus: Studies from the Seven Churches of Revelation, has received dozens of five-star reviews from readers.

Chris began in full-time ministry in 2006 and began to preach internationally in 2009, helping many congregations grow, flourish, and expand. His desire for missions is to train and educate pastors, encourage congregations, support the vision of local church, and show the love of God to the culture. He has done this successfully for a decade in over forty nations of the world in Europe, Africa, South America, Asia, and the Caribbean, working with both traditional churches and the underground and persecuted church.

Chris earned a B.A. in Pastoral Studies from North Central University and an M.A. in Exegetical Theology, magna cum laude, from Moody Theological Seminary. He is a sought-after Greek scholar for his ability to make God’s Word come alive from the Greek in a unique way. Chris is often invited to present Greek and hermeneutics workshops at Bible and ministry schools. He recently began working on his Ph.D. at the University of Wales, Bangor, in the area of Johannine literature, particularly the book of Revelation.

His previous books include the self-published Living as a Spirit: Hearing the Voice of God on Purpose, The 85 Questions You Ask When You Begin a Relationship with God, The Believer’s Journey, and Escaping the Haunting Past: A Handbook for Deliverance.

 

 

Read an Excerpt

Study 12: Immeasurable: Hyperballō; ὑπερβάλλω)

And what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the working of his great might. (Ephesians 1:19)

Over the years, I’ve been privileged to travel to many lands and countries to preach the gospel. One of the best parts about this is experiencing the different cultures, particularly their food and cuisines. Meals are times of joy and jubilee, when the hosts go all out to make me feel at home.

This is especially true in Sicily. I’ve often joked with my Sicilian friends that eating is a full-time job there. Sicilians take pride in making sure you are well fed, and you’ll often hear them say, “Mangia” (eat) or “Mangia qualcosa” (eat something), even right after you’ve just eaten. Food is of the utmost importance there and the answer to many of life’s problems. I understand this because my grandparents were of Sicilian descent.

There’s a joke in Sicily about a young man with a guilty conscience who tells his mother, “Mama, I’ve robbed a bank.” She says, “Well, that’s not good.” Then, he says, “And I’ve stolen a car.” His mama says, “I see. That’s not good either.” Then he says, “And I haven’t eaten today.” And she jumps up from her seat and screams, “What! You haven’t eaten? What’s wrong with you!?”

I once invented a joke of my own that the Sicilians found funny. I said, “After studying God’s Word, I’ve discovered the disciples of Jesus were Sicilian.” They looked perplexed. While they were still scratching their heads, I had them turn to John 4:31, which says, “Meanwhile the disciples were urging him [Jesus], saying, ‘Rabbi, eat.’” I think that joke has been making its way around Italy ever since.

Needless to say, there’s never been a time when I’ve been disappointed with mealtimes. I’ve been to Sicily twelve times and I can’t think of one instance when I didn’t have more than enough food placed before my eyes. I will never forget the first meal I had in Sicily. It was on a Sunday afternoon after church. I was told we were going to have “a little something” before dinner that evening. They brought out course after course after course. I was stuffed to the gills before the main course even arrived¾and this wasn’t even dinner.

My translator told me later, “Chris, the Sicilians go all out for every meal. You are never going to survive if you try eating everything.” If I’ve learned anything about the wonderful Sicilian people over the years, it’s that they don’t mess around when it comes to food: it’s always going to be over and above, more than enough, and plenty left afterwards.

The apostle Paul talks about God’s power this way in Ephesians 1:19. Here, Paul was sharing with his church in Ephesus what he prays for them. He tells them that he prays they will know the hope that God has called them to and the riches of God’s “glorious inheritance in the saints” (verse 18).

The hope that God called us to represents the beginning of the Christian life. While we did call upon God to be saved (see Romans 10:13), He first called us. He called us to belong to Christ and have a new life free from sin, to be holy and separate from the world, and be part of God’s celestial family.

The riches of His glorious inheritance in the saints alludes to the end of the Christian life. It is our total inheritance, which we will receive when the fullness of time comes. Until then, we are waiting for it with patience. In short, verse 18 speaks about the beginning and end of the Christian life.

At present, we find ourselves in the middle. Our Christian life has taken off, but we have yet to receive the totality of God’s promises. As we make our way toward receiving this final inheritance, we find our path strewn with all sorts of challenges, difficulties, and suffering. To push us past these and over the goal line, God has given us His power—“what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe.”

The Greek word for “immeasurable” is hyperballō. It is a two-part Greek word that comes from: hyper (above, over, beyond, more than) and ballō (to throw or cast). It literally meant to “throw beyond” or “surpass.” Over time, it came to express other means of excessiveness such as outbidding someone at an auction, extreme heat from a fire, unbearable pain, and the intense brightness of stars. Hence, it was a word used for something that stood out, excelled the norms, and went beyond the standard amount.

The idea in this Scripture is that God supplies an over-and-above ration of His power to help us overcome the obstacles and challenges we face so we can receive the full inheritance promised to us. Not just a little, just enough, or even more than enough, but an over-and-above, highly excessive amount, like a meal in Sicily. We can stuff ourselves with God’s power and never come close to exhausting it. It’s all around us and is ours for the taking. And we aren’t to be stingy with it because there is enough to go around and plenty to take home.

Perhaps you are wondering how you can tap into this smorgasbord of power. The way Paul tapped into it: through prayer. When you come into prayer, you stand before a banquet table that is heaped with everything you could possibly need to overcome your troubles. And you are free to take.

 

My Review

As a lover of words and languages, reading has always been my favorite pastime, and I am one of those people who reads the dictionary for fun, always looking to add to my vocabulary. I took Latin in college and fell in love with it, especially due to the fact that it forms the foundation for so many of our English words. As soon as I saw the title of Chris Palmer’s Greek Word Study, signing up to review it was a no-brainer; last year I read and thoroughly enjoyed his book Letters From Jesus, so I enthusiastically dove into this new offering.

Because I wanted to study and savor each of the 90 terms that Palmer discusses, it took me much longer than usual to read this book, and it is one that I can unequivocally say I will be rereading. I very much appreciate Palmer’s deep yet easy-to-understand teaching about each word, presenting both the word and the Scripture first in English, then in Koine Greek (the original language of the New Testament), followed by a relevant contemporary story or application and an explanation of what the Scripture and the particular Greek word mean in Biblical context. With an emphasis on inflection, he makes connections between familiar verses and the culture of the time, demonstrating how the original early church audience would have understood the words and stories.

Some of the words that Palmer writes about in Greek Word Study that fascinate me the most involve how we need to conduct ourselves as Christians and our relationship with the Lord. He instructs that panoplian, for instance, refers to the whole armor of God, and while discussing execheo (sound forth), he exhorts that “If you aren’t already, believe God to make you a Krakatoa for the kingdom.” Considering that the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883 exhibited the loudest sound known to history, this is an incredible hint at what God can do through us. Likewise, with poiema (workmanship), he references Ephesians 2:10 and Romans 1:20, pointing out that “By using poiema in his letter to the Ephesians, Paul makes a connection between those who are in Christ and the creation account in Genesis.” One more example is particularly timely; nepho means sober-minded, and Palmer teaches that we need to take God’s Word into account in all that we see, hear, and do. “So, mix your media intake with the Word.” I think that this is always sage advice, and never more so than in this present time!

One relatively minor quibble I have is that Palmer writes that “Humans have inhabited Crete for at least 130,000 years”, which goes against the basic tenet of young earth creationism. That issue aside, however, I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in studying Scripture more deeply and gaining a greater understanding of early church culture. Those who enjoy languages will find Greek Word Study of particular interest, but no knowledge of foreign languages, Greek or otherwise, is necessary. At the end of the book, there is both a Greek-English and an English-Greek index of all of the terms studied for additional reference. I hope that our words echo those of Solon the Athenian: “I grow old always learning many things.”

I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

My rating: 5 stars ♥♥♥♥♥

 

Blog Stops

Book Reviews From an Avid Reader, August 13

Through the Lens of Scripture, August 13

For the Love of Literature, August 14

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, August 15

deb’s Book Review, August 15

Texas Book-aholic, August 16

Just Your Average reviews, August 16

Inklings and notions, August 17

Just the Write Escape, August 18

CarpeDiem, August 18

Abba’s Prayer Warrior Princess, August 19

For Him and My Family, August 20

Quiet Workings, August 21

Batya’s Bits, August 22

Mary Hake, August 22

Godly Book Reviews, August 23

KarenSueHadley, August 24

Captive Dreams Window, August 24

Lis Loves Reading, August 25

Artistic Nobody, August 26 (Guest Review from Donna Cline)

As He Leads is Joy, August 26

 

Giveaway

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To celebrate his tour, Chris is giving away the grand prize package of a $20 Starbucks gift card!!

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/fec0/greek-word-study-celebration-tour-giveaway