Tag Archives: Biblical fiction

A Voice Within the Flame Review and GIVEAWAY!

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About the Book

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Book: A Voice within the Flame

Author: Henry O. Arnold

Genre: Biblical Fiction

Release Date: December 1, 2020

A son of the vow…a voice for a nation

For many long years, Hannah prayed for a son; a son finally granted to her only when she promised him back to God. Samuel, son of the vow, grows up in the Tabernacle, his childhood spent in the company of priests and Levites, in service to a God who was always silent. Samuel watches in dismay as the sons of the High Priest flaunt their wicked behavior, yet he knows that Yahweh will eventually have a reckoning. It is not until he hears a Voice call to him from within the flames of the altar that he realizes he has a part to play in this drama.

This young man hears another voice from a maiden who captures his heart, and he begins to dream of a future beyond the confines of the Tabernacle. But when Israel’s enemies threaten to destroy his world, it appears as though everything Samuel ever held dear may come tumbling down around him.

Not even a great prophet, whose words never fall to the ground, can keep Israel from crying out for a king. The Lord calls upon Samuel to guide the nation and her new king through the years of turmoil they must face.

In this tale of triumph and scorn, deepest love and burning rivalries, the new epoch is given a voice…and it is a Song of Prophets and Kings.

Click HERE to get your copy!

About the Author

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Henry O. Arnold has co-authored a work of fiction, Hometown Favorite, with Bill Barton, and nonfiction, KABUL24, with Ben Pearson. He also co-wrote and produced with Steve Taylor (director) and Ben Pearson the film The Second Chance starring Michael W. Smith, the screenplay for the authorized film documentary on evangelist Billy Graham, God’s Ambassador, and the documentary film KABUL24, based on the book which is the story of western and Afghani hostages held captive by the Taliban for 105 days. He lives on a farm in Tennessee with his lovely wife Kay. They have two beautiful daughters married to two handsome men with three above-average grandchildren. For more information please visit: www.henryoarnold.com

More from Henry

So many people have asked me why I became a writer. I usually respond with a one-word answer: unemployment. I know, not very inspirational or romantic, but it was a reality-based choice. I had (and still am) been a professional actor for about ten years. Received a lot of diplomas affirming my professional choice and gotten a lot of gigs that convinced me that I was employable. Then I hit a dry-spell. The theatre company I had helped to found went belly-up. I also had recently gotten married. So I was feeling the mixture of joy and dejection at the same time. It was then that I chose to begin writing a series of one-man shows on biblical characters. I was able to combine my passion for the theatre and my love of Scripture in one artistic form.

After the golden age of theatre in the Greek and Roman times, the theatre went dark, very dark as in Dark Ages, and for centuries it was thus. But it was the church that brought the theatre back to life by staging passion plays on biblical subjects. Since most people could not read at the time, it was a great way to tell the folks some Bible stories. It was my desire to do the same thing with my one-man shows. The third of my one-man plays was on the character of King David. I wrote it while shooting a film. For an actor in a film there is a lot of “hurry up and wait.” So I used my “wait” time to write. Within a year I was showcasing the play to some select audiences before I begin to get some regular jobs out of this show and the two others I had previously written.

Then I decided to write what I thought would be a trilogy of the first three kings of Israel. These would be full-length plays for a multiple cast. The first installment was entitled “The Mighty Have Fallen,” and the focus was on King Saul. My father was the head of the theatre department at a university, and he was kind enough to produce and direct the show with his students. It was a success, and after an extensive rewrite, I sent a copy to Academy Award winner, F. Murray Abraham, thinking he would be the perfect King Saul. He wrote a terse and unambiguous response, “Not my cup of tea, but thanks.”

I knew then that my artistic dream might be more of an uphill climb than I had anticipated, and I settled into scheduling the one-man shows around all the other theatre and film work I was doing. But the dream of writing an historical fiction series on the first three kings and the first three major prophets of Israel never left me. I called the series, A Song of Prophets and Kings, and it simmered on the back-burner until about five years ago when I sat down in earnest and began to write a first draft of what has now become A Voice Within the Flame. It was totally liberating to write this first volume in the form of a novel. I did not have to worry about budgets or too many characters or too many big scenes. I could just tell a story.

It took a long to find the right home for this story, but I am excited to welcome into the literary landscape my dream of presenting the first installment of my historical fiction series to all readers who love the drama found in these great biblical stories.

My Review

Luke 10:24 “For I tell you that many prophets and kings wanted to see what you see but did not see it, and to hear what you hear but did not hear it.

As I’ve mentioned before, Biblical fiction is generally a hit-or-miss genre, particularly when the main subject is an actual Biblical figure or event as opposed to a fictional character interacting with or living alongside people from the Bible, and even more so if the focus is on the Old Testament. Remaining true to the inerrant Word of God while creating a narrative of what life was like—the minutiae—before, during, and after the details that we read in the Bible requires research, prayer, and inspiration. It is not an easy task, and there are some readers who shy away from this category for various understandable reasons. As a result, it can be difficult to find books that explore the ancient Biblical world without superimposing modernity onto it in the form of customs, ideas, and interpretations. Some of the best authors in the genre include Tessa Afshar, Mesu Andrews, Connilyn Cossette, Brennan McPherson, and now, Henry Arnold.

A previously-unknown-to-me author, Henry Arnold has just released A Voice Within the Flame, book one of The Song of Prophets and Kings series. From the beautiful front cover that harkens back to Moses’ encounter with Yahweh in the burning bush and subtly alludes to the Mosaic Law still in place during this time period to the narrative itself, this book draws readers in immediately. I will admit that I had some apprehension at first, wondering if it would be boring or would diverge too much from the Biblical account. However, I can honestly say that once I started reading, I didn’t want to stop! I did occasionally cross-reference a few things with the Bible, but more for the purpose of refreshing my memory or learning more than for fact-checking. What I found most intriguing about this book is the background of Samuel; as with any extra-Biblical text, it is not necessarily exactly how each event happened or how each person felt, but I think that Arnold does well in using the Bible to inform his story and give readers a reasonable idea of the life of Samuel.

One of the aspects of Biblical fiction that I love the most is the humanity that it brings to the people of the Bible. For seasoned Christians especially, we can become so familiar with the stories of the Word that we rarely pause to think about how these people felt in the situations they faced or in day-to-day living. A Voice Within the Flame offers a possible account of how the events unfolded. Named Samuel, meaning “God has heard”, the miracle-baby changes the lives of not only his own family forever, but Israel itself. As heart-wrenching as it is to read about Hannah giving Samuel back to God around age 4 to learn and to serve in the Tabernacle, it is even more heart-warming to view it all from the perspective of history and to see (at least in part) that God was and always will be in control. As Hannah marvels at Samuel’s birth, “There had been no guarantee of this blessing, only the hope, and now they touched with their hands this visible, human soul of Yahweh’s favor.”  Eli, the High Priest who teaches Samuel, also recognizes something special about him. “This was their son, eleven years in the making, Yahweh’s gift to them…a gift the Almighty would reclaim.

As with so much of the Bible, a great deal of it is being fulfilled before our eyes, and the same can be said in Samuel’s case. The High Priest Eli teaches his students, Samuel among them, the foreshadowing of persecution and trials ahead. He warns them about the Benjamites, referencing the story of the Levite and his concubines from Judges 19-21 and proclaiming that “slaughter begets slaughter.” In a prescient lesson regarding this serious issue, he remarks that “To serve the people of Israel, you must know the people of Israel. Know our dark hearts and corrupted minds. Know that we are broken and fearful. Know that the longer Yahweh is kept at a distance the more craven we become.” How sadly yet starkly true this is for us today, as we near the end of 2020! Later in Samuel’s story, he follows in Eli’s footsteps to some degree, as his sons also rebel against Yahweh. Samuel, however, is upright, the last of the judges and a man who listened to and followed God, establishing the monarchy of Israel by anointing Saul, a Benjamite. That did not work out well for Saul, in the end, and eventually the shepherd boy David becomes king, in the patrilineage of Jesus Himself.

An epic story of the necessity of putting God first, A Voice Within the Flame separates the main sections of Samuel’s story into four parts and proves that God is always working behind the scenes and always in control, despite outward appearances.

I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

My rating: 5 stars ♥♥♥♥♥

Blog Stops

For the Love of Literature, December 16

Through the Fire Blogs, December 17

Mary Hake, December 17

Texas Book-aholic, December 18

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, December 19

Inklings and notions, December 20

For Him and My Family, December 21

deb’s Book Review, December 22

Sara Jane Jacobs, December 23

Adventures of a Travelers Wife, December 24 (Author Interview)

Our Whiskey Lullaby, December 24

Truth and Grace Homeschool Academy, December 25

Artistic Nobody, December 26 (Guest Review from Joni Truex)

Ashley’s Bookshelf, December 27

Locks, Hooks and Books, December 28

Because I said so — and other adventures in Parenting, December 29

Giveaway

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To celebrate his tour, Henry is giving away the grand prize package of a signed copy of the book and a $25 Amazon gift card!!

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/10500/a-voice-within-the-flame-celebration-tour-giveaway

Trouble in the Ruins Review and GIVEAWAY!

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About the Book

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Book: Trouble in the Ruins

Author: C.L. Smith

Genre: Biblical fiction

Release Date: September 2019

Return to the turbulence of ancient Canaan in Book Three of The Stones of Gilgal. Even the raging floods of the Jordan could not stop the Israelites from crossing the river and setting up camp near Jericho. Canaanite kings and kingdoms—even the Anakim giants—are in turmoil. Former enemies jostle for power in new alliances, united only in their determination to destroy the Israelite invaders.

When the massive fortifications of Jericho collapse, Salmon rushes into the ruins to save Rahab, the beautiful harlot who had rescued him and his fellow spy from certain death. But saving her from her own city is not so easy. And that is only the beginning of the trouble, treachery and devastating ruins they and their friends face as they settle into their new life in the Promised Land.

Click HERE to get your copy!

About the Author

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C.L. SMITH, former missionary, retired junior high English/history teacher, has captivated audiences around the world for years with the timeless thrill of biblical tales. Now her six-part Stones of Gilgal saga brings the mayhem and miracles of the book Joshua to life. Well researched and beautifully written, the author weaves her lifetime love of learning and people into the fabric of the biblical text, creating a tapestry of rich scenes and colorful characters the reader will not soon forget.

Learn more at www.stonesofgilgal.com

More from C.L. Smith

The Stones of Gilgal biblical novels follow the epic adventures of a group of ordinary young Israelites. As they battle evil together, they sink their roots deeper and deeper into the bedrock of God’s Truth and Love, slowly growing from a stand of saplings to a forest of giants.

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Two of the seven young characters in my series have to deal with a lot of Trouble in the Ruins in this book. Lots of trouble. Lots of ruins.

Rahab the Harlot barely escapes the ruins of Jericho, but the ruins of her former life threaten to keep her ever an alien among the people of Yahweh.

Abihail is Acsah’s best friend from childhood, but she is also a fictionalized daughter-in-law of the biblical Achan. Her life is slammed with heart-rending trouble and ruin as that horrific Old Testament drama unfolds.

The Title: Trouble in the Ruins

The inspiration for this title comes from a couple of “plays on words” in Hebrew.

Trouble: The name Achan in Hebrew sounds very similar to the word Achor meaning trouble. The story of the biblical character Achan is forever tied to the word trouble at the end of Joshua 7 when the valley where he was stoned and buried under a “monument” of rocks received the name the Valley of Achor.

Ruins: Achan’s sin led to defeat at a little fortress known as Ai which means ruin. Some scholars suggest that the fortress was built on or near the ruins of a city destroyed in an earlier time. Following the glory of the crossing of the Jordan and the crumbling walls of Jericho—the Hebrew mind would find great dramatic irony in Israel being defeated by a “ruin.” The story jolts us out of complacency, underscoring the life and death consequences of obedience versus breaking covenant with God.

My Review

“Grandpa’s generation, the Exodus generation, found significance in teaching their children to live in covenant with Yahweh. You are the Gilgal generation. The shame of failure is rolled away, and tonight, we celebrate a new beginning.”

Biblical fiction is a difficult genre to write, and in my experience, it tends to be either hit or miss. Enough detail to inform readers about the time period and pique their interest, but without ever adding to the inerrant word of the Bible. Telling a story that will lead readers to the Bible to learn more without compromising THE story. Despite the challenges, I’m glad that there are authors who are willing to produce books set in this era, to make us examine Scripture more closely and to develop an understanding of what life was like for the people who actually lived the Bible.

Book three in The Stones of Gilgal saga, Trouble in the Ruins details the Israelite take-over of Canaan after their miraculous crossing of the Jordan. Author C.L. Smith again writes an engaging, page-turning novel replete with action, reality, and faith. In my case, I know that I tend to become so familiar with accounts from the Bible that I can gloss over them without really studying them and considering the details, whether there are any provided or not. That is part of why I love this series so much. I feel as if I am truly an eyewitness to what is unfolding as the scenes and characters come to life on the pages. Trouble in the Ruins focuses primarily on Rahab and the fate of Jericho, including its aftermath. I recently read Rahab: Woman of Jericho by Diana Wallis Taylor (see my review HERE), but I felt that Rahab was portrayed there with a much cleaner backstory and an overall too-much-improved image. Here, on the other hand, Smith presents Rahab as a former prostitute who is nervous and unsure, a refugee along with her family. She is unfamiliar with Israelite customs but willing to learn, which I think may be a part of the reason that she was spared and later given the honor of being in Jesus’ lineage. This also raises a connection to society today: Even if you come from a sketchy background or have a sinful past, all that is needed is to repent and accept the Lord as Your Savior. He will turn every broken piece of your life into a beautiful masterpiece.

A few other facts particularly drew my attention, too. For some reason, my mind never fully grasped the fact that the cord hung in Rahab’s window was scarlet for a specific purpose, as well: “The color of blood and death. The color of Passover faithfulness.” Just as Yahweh miraculously saved the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, led them through the forty years in the wilderness, brought them safely across the flooded Jordan, and delivered Jericho into their hands, His supernatural providence and power provided for them again as Rahab and her family transitioned into life with the Israelites. This, along with the parts of the narrative that feature Salmon and other Israelite characters, underscore the human-ness of the characters, who face fear and doubt but stand behind the God who protects them. Also, the Israelite purification ritual made much more sense to me after realizing that they did this in order to remain clean while in the presence of God, Who inhabited the Ark of the Covenant. I also can’t help but think that America in 2020 greatly resembles Jericho, with its corruption, chaos, and rampant sin, and I think that we would do well to heed Rahab’s story and repent and follow the Lord before it’s too late.

Included at the end of the book is a List of Characters, a very useful guide to both the true and fictional people in the story (I personally think it would have been more useful to place this at the beginning, but that’s just my preference).

I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

My rating: 5 stars ♥♥♥♥♥

Blog Stops

Texas Book-aholic, September 1

For the Love of Literature, September 2

For Him and My Family, September 3

Sara Jane Jacobs, September 4

Emily Yager, September 4

Artistic Nobody, September 5 (Guest Review from Joni Truex)

Locks, Hooks and Books, September 6

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, September 7

deb’s Book Review, September 7

Inklings and notions, September 8

Betti Mace, September 9

Babbling Becky L’s Book Impressions, September 10

Batya’s Bits, September 11

Ashley’s Bookshelf, September 12

Mary Hake, September 12

Because I said so — and other adventures in Parenting, September 13

Library Lady’s Kid Lit, September 14

Giveaway

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To celebrate her tour, C.L. Smith is giving away the grand prize of a $50 Amazon gift card!! (U.S. Only)

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/fff7/trouble-in-the-ruins-celebration-tour-giveaway

Rahab Review and GIVEAWAY!

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About the Book

 

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Book: Rahab

Author: Diana Wallis Taylor

Genre: Biblical Fiction

Some biblical scholars maintain that the woman in Jericho who hid Joshua’s two spies was a harlot or a prostitute. But if that was the case, how did this woman, Rahab, become one of the ancestors of Jesus Christ? Wouldn’t the Father ensure a pure lineage for His Son?

In this historical fiction, author Diana Wallis Taylor offers a beautiful story of intrigue that explains how Rahab came to be the mother of Boaz, grandmother of Obed, and great-grandmother of Jesse, the father of King David.

In Rahab, Woman of Jericho, readers discover a Rahab who is a descendent of the tribe of Ephraim, one of the ten lost tribes of Israel. Her clan left Egypt and settled in Canaan before the Hebrews were enslaved. Although they did not wander in the desert with Moses for forty years, nor did they hear the laws that the Lord gave to His people, they still worshipped the one true God.

Rahab marries Radames, a young Egyptian officer, who is to become the new governor of Jericho. They live in the Egyptian embassy set in the city wall. When the Israelites approach Canaan with their army, pharaoh sends word that he is withdrawing his troops. Radames fabricates a story to tell Jericho’s king, but Hammurabi doesn’t believe it…and he has his eye on the beautiful Rahab.

What will happen to Rahab after the lecherous king poisons her husband? How can she save her family from the invading Israelites? God parted the waters of the Jordan River for them—will He likewise provide miracles and blessings to her Ephraimite clan if they can rejoin their people?

Click HERE to get your copy!

 

About the Author

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Diana Wallis Taylor is an award-winning author of more than a dozen books, including such novels as Hadassah, Queen Esther of Persia; Lydia, Woman of Philippi; Mary, Chosen of God; Ruth, Mother of Kings; Mary Magdalene; and Journey to the Well. She is also the author of Halloween: Harmless Fun or Risky Business?

Diana’s additional published works include a collection of poetry, Wings of the Wind; an Easter cantata, “Glorious,” written with a musical collaborator and available on Sheet Music Plus; and contributions to various magazines and compilations.

She received her B.A. in Elementary Education at San Diego State University and was an elementary school teacher for twenty-two years. She operated two coffeehouse/used bookstores and later retired from a private Christian college as Director of Conference Services.

Diana makes her home in San Diego, California. Readers are welcome to reach out to her and read her blog at www.dianawallistaylor.com.

 

Read an Excerpt

At one large, ornate building that was obviously a temple, young women wearing flimsy garments, much jewelry, and elaborate make-up were lounging on the steps.

“Who are they, Radames?”

“Temple priestesses.”

“Women priests? They do not look like priests.”

He took a deep breath. “They are temple prostitutes who serve their god. By laying with a worshipper, they believe they assist him or her to honor their god.”

She put her hand on his arm. “I cannot judge others, but my people worship one God, Jehovah, who does not require that sort of worship.”

Radames seemed thoughtful and made no reply.

Her family had lived among the Canaanites for years, but she had never seen such a temple before. Beth-horon was so small—wouldn’t she have seen one if it was there? Perhaps her parents and their parents had endeavored to shield their children from the worst pagan practices.

Just before they returned home, she looked back at the palace, looming over the city like some evil monster. It sent a chill through her.

When they were safely in the embassy again, they sat in the dining hall and ate their mid-day meal: fresh bread, goat cheese, figs, and pomegranates, with a cup of beer for Radames and wine for Rahab.

Rahab turned to Radames. “My lord, the Canaanites have so many gods. You said you worshipped a fewer number. I am not familiar with Egyptian gods and would like to hear about them.”

He looked at her thoughtfully and took her hand in his. “Amon is the main one; he is considered the king of the gods and goddesses, and we believe he is father to the Pharaohs. His female counterpart is Amunet, called the Female Hidden One. They had a son, Khonsu, the moon god. Mut, which means ‘mother’ in Egyptian, is a deity who wears two crowns on her head. Osiris is considered the oldest child of the earth god, Zeb, and the sky goddess, Nut. He is the god of the afterlife. That is why many things are buried with the body when an Egyptian dies, so that he has what he needs in the life after death.”

She remained silent, listening, her thoughts twirling round about. She had married Radames out of love and her father had assured her that marrying an Egyptian was not forbidden because of their family heritage. But how was she to deal with a husband who worshipped idols? She smiled at him. “Tell me more.”

He sliced a piece of cheese and playfully fed it to her before continuing.

“Anubis is the divine embalmer. Before Osiris, Anubis patrolled the underworld. He is known for mummifying the dead and guiding their souls toward the afterlife. Horus is the god of vengeance and is the child of Osiris and Isis. He avenged his father’s death and ruled Egypt. Thoth is the god of knowledge and wisdom, who settles disputes between good and evil. He maintains the universe by his mastery of calculations. We believe him to be the author of science, philosophy, and magic. He is also the one who created our calendar. Sekhmet is the goddess of war and healing. She can destroy the enemies of her allies. Geb is the god of earth, who represents crops and healing. We believe he retains the souls of the wicked.”

It was a lot to digest. “Those are all your gods?”

He shook his head. “Only some of them, the most important ones.”

“And you worship all these gods?”

“When I am home with my family or with my soldiers, I profess to worship them. My father would be insulted and perhaps disown me if I even hinted that I did not.”

She stared at him, realizing what he had just revealed. Hope rose in her heart. “You say that as if there is something else you believe.”

Radames hesitated, as if uncertain how to proceed. “I don’t know,” he said finally. “I have grown up with all our gods, but prayers to them are not answered. I have not mentioned this before, beloved, but I was married years ago, at the age of eighteen. My wife was only fifteen. Both she and our infant son died in childbirth a year later. I made offering after offering to the gods, praying for her to live, but there was no answer—and no comfort. So I do not put my faith in any god.”

Rahab reached out to touch his arm. “Oh, Radames. I am so sorry about your wife and child. That must have been so hard to bear. Did my father know of this?”

“I told him that first night I came.”

“And what did he say?”

“He said that I may someday wish to speak to you about your God…when I am ready to do so.”

 

My Review

“Something in her heart longed to truly know the God of her people. He had made a way to save her when there seemed to be no way.”

Biblical fiction is often a hit-or-miss genre, and readers tend to either enjoy it or avoid it altogether. I can understand both sides of that case and tend to stick with trusted authors I’m either familiar with or who have been recommended to me by reliable sources. Last year I did take a chance with then new-to-me author Diana Wallis Taylor’s Hadassah and found it intriguing. As the author herself acknowledges, she likes to choose Biblical women who are generally not well-regarded and offer a different perspective of them. One requirement that I have for reading Biblical fiction is that it does not change fundamental truths about Scripture or promote anything that does not line up with God’s Word. Good Biblical fiction, in my opinion, causes readers to more deeply contemplate and connect with the Lord through His Word, the Bible.

In her most recent novel, Rahab: Woman of Jericho, Taylor explores this enigmatic figure from the book of Joshua. I will be honest and say that I do not think that this is truly plausible as Rahab’s backstory because I have always read among various translations that she was a prostitute, and I think that her being a redeemed prostitute in the lineage of Jesus makes more sense and demonstrates God’s grace and mercy, particularly considering that she is mentioned in the Hall of Faith in Hebrews 11. Also, Taylor portrays Rahab and her family as Jewish, the only ones in Upper Beth-horon. That being said, though, I respect the author’s creative license and the reasons for her interpretation, and I appreciate that she addresses these at the end of the book.

The genealogy of Rahab is given several times throughout the novel, and I found this helpful in connecting her to the historical story itself and to the bigger picture of ultimately becoming part of the lineage of Jesus. It is interesting that her name means “remembering Egypt”, and that is a theme that plays out in a variety of ways as the story unfolds. There are also several elements that stood out to me as having very clear contemporary parallels. Just as, in this story, Rahab and her family are terrified when Jericho is attacked but are spared as followers of Jehovah, so are we living in frightening times amidst a global pandemic and increasing unrest and chaos, and so too will God spare us if we are truly devoted to Him. Trust is key. There is also an urgency to share God (and in the modern world, the Gospel) with others because the walls are falling down, literally in Rahab’s case and more metaphorically in ours. Another thing that struck me is the acknowledgement of the emotional and psychological impact of killing that the Israelite soldiers bore. The overall effect of everything that the Israelites went through on their journey became much more apparent to me than it had before, and I am so grateful to live in the time after Jesus’s sacrifice!

I received a complimentary copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

My rating: 4 stars ♥♥♥♥

 

Blog Stops

Inklings and notions, August 8

Novels Corner, August 8

A Reader’s Brain, August 9

Our Whiskey Lullaby, August 9

Texas Book-aholic, August 10

Hebrews 12 Endurance , August 11

lakesidelivingsite, August 11

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, August 12

For Him and My Family, August 13

Betti Mace, August 14

Splashes of Joy, August 15

deb’s Book Review, August 16

CarpeDiem, August 17

For the Love of Literature, August 18

Connect in Fiction, August 19

She Lives To Read, August 20

Mary Hake, August 20

Lights in a Dark World, August 21

 

Giveaway

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To celebrate her tour, Diana is giving away the grand prize of a $20 Starbucks gift card!!

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/feba/rahab-celebration-tour-giveaway